Keeping in touch with the family - the importance of pedigree tracking for later generation breeding programme management: the example of Acacia auriculiformis in Vietnam

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Bush, David; Kien, Nguyen; Hoa, Duong; Harwood, Chris


2017-07-24


Conference Material


IUFRO Acacia Conference 2017: "Towards a sustainable future for Acacia plantations", Yogyakarta Indonesia, 24 July - 28 August 2017


1


The history of Acacia domestication and breeding throughout Asia has involved large-scale movement of forest genetic resources amongst countries. Breeding programmes, some of which are now entering the third generation, typically comprise families from a variety of sources including land-race selections, wild material imported from Australia, eastern Indonesia and Papua New Guinea, selections from breeding programmes in the country where the programme is being conducted and selections from other countries' programmes. Revisiting and possibly recovering records and establishing and keeping track of the pedigree of this variety of seed sources should now be a high priority for tree breeders. Establishing the pedigree has two major benefits. Firstly, it will be possible to check the relatedness of material currently included in the breeding population. Though new infusions from overseas programmes may have been made, it is likely that these may have come from the same wild origins as those already included. Having this information enables breeders to avoid inbreeding and maximise the diversity of selections when screening for traits such as pest and disease resistance. Secondly, modern analytical techniques and software allow the tree breeder to make use of the pedigree information to more accurately estimate breeding values and other genetic parameters. The simple assumption that each family is unrelated is likely to lead to bias and error. > We present a case study involving a recently reconstructed pedigree for the VAFS A. auriculiformis programme and analysis of second-generation trials that make use of this information at two sites. Though VAFS had good basic records of the seedlots in their programme supplied by the CSIRO Australian Tree Seed Centre, it took considerable effort to establish the provenance of origin of some seedlots, particularly those that had been imported from Thailand's first generation programme.


IUFRO


Jogjakarta, Indonesia


Genetics not elsewhere classified


EP171358


Conference Abstract


English


Bush, David; Kien, Nguyen; Hoa, Duong; Harwood, Chris. Keeping in touch with the family - the importance of pedigree tracking for later generation breeding programme management: the example of Acacia auriculiformis in Vietnam. In: IUFRO Acacia Conference 2017: "Towards a sustainable future for Acacia plantations"; 24 July - 28 August 2017; Yogyakarta Indonesia. Jogjakarta, Indonesia: IUFRO; 2017. 1.http://hdl.handle.net/102.100.100/88256?index=1



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