A Sensor Array for Rapid Screening of Dissolved Hydrocarbons in Sea Surface Waters

Select | Print


Ross, Andrew; Qi, Xiubin; Crooke, Emma; Stalvies, Charlotte ORCID ID icon; Fuentes, David; Armand, Stephane; Revill, Andy ORCID ID icon; Talukder, Asrar ORCID ID icon


2012-07-28


Conference Material


Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry North America 32nd Annual Meeting, Hynes Convention Center, Boston, Massachusetts, 13–17 November 2011


1


Recent oil release events at Deepwater Horizon in Gulf of Mexico block MC252, and Montara in Australia, have outlined the need to rapidly survey the hydrocarbon content of near surface water over large geographic areas of the ocean surface in order to measure water quality. Conventional oceanographic approaches involve water sampling and measurement at predetermined stations, often through the deployment of conductivity, depth and temperature (CTD) profilers with attached Niskin bottle water sampling apparatus. The analysis of water samples for hydrocarbons can use a number of extraction methods followed by gas chromatography or gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. These methods and analysis permit the detailed determination and quantification of individual gaseous, volatile and higher molecular weight hydrocarbons compounds. Where hydrocarbon concentration determination takes place on-board, each sample preparation and analysis can take several hours limiting the numbers of samples that can be taken reducing either or both the spatial or temporal sampling frequency. Hydrocarbon sensors have been recently developed for marine applications. These sensors have both low hydrocarbon detection limits in the parts per million to parts per trillion range and rapid measurement cycle times in the order of seconds to minutes. In addition the devices are ruggedized for field deployments. These sensors include fluorimeters tuned for the detection of poly-aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and sensors for volatile organic compounds (VOC) tuned for the low molecular weight hydrocarbons. These sensors offer the potential to provide rapid, spatial and temporal sampling and detection; however they do not provide detailed hydrocarbon compositional data. Separate sampling and analytic techniques for hydrocarbon analysis are described in the accompanying poster. In this paper the design and implementation of an arrayed sensor system in an underway configuration combined with onboard complimentary conventional analysis is described. In response to the Deepwater Horizon oil release a hydrocarbon sensor array system comprising Chelsea Aquatracker, Contros and Trios flourimeters was deployed and operated for over 80 days in the in the Gulf of Mexico. Data was acquired covering over 7,5008,998 linear nautical miles (~13,900 line kms) from June 5th to the September 15th 2010 during and after the MC252 spill. This data was mapped and reported to the Unified Area Command daily. During this time the system was successfully operated in various sea states and in environments ranging from riverine to oceanic waters, and from pristine waters through to waters with oil slicks at the surface.


Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry


Environmental Monitoring


EP174854


Conference Abstract


English


Ross, Andrew; Qi, Xiubin; Crooke, Emma; Stalvies, Charlotte; Fuentes, David; Armand, Stephane; Revill, Andy; Talukder, Asrar. A Sensor Array for Rapid Screening of Dissolved Hydrocarbons in Sea Surface Waters. In: Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry North America 32nd Annual Meeting; 13–17 November 2011; Hynes Convention Center, Boston, Massachusetts. Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry; 2012. 1. http://hdl.handle.net/102.100.100/99974?index=1



Loading citation data...

Citation counts
(Requires subscription to view)