Temperature function integration and its importance in the storage and distribution of flesh foods above the freezing point

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Olley, J.; Ratkowsky, D. A.


1973


Journal Article


Food Technology Australia


25


2


66-73


The invention in New Zealand of a temperature function integrator has stimulated the search for a universal spoilage model for flesh foods. When data for increasing temperature increments were fitted to Arrhenius-type equations, a relative rate function was found which would appear to be valid for all types of fish spoilage reactions whether chemical, bacterial, organoleptic or physical. Data for meat and poultry are limited, but there are indications that the same model and thus the same instrument could be used for all flesh foods. The relative spoilage rate is a sufficiently linear function of temperature between 0 and about 8C, and thus the equation of Spencer and Baines (1964) with a coeffieient equal to 0.24 can be used with some confidence in this temperature range.


Food Science Australia; Temperature/Integrator/Organoleptic


English


procite:caf5430a-1acf-4895-a4dc-fcd8b666995d


Olley, J.; Ratkowsky, D. A. Temperature function integration and its importance in the storage and distribution of flesh foods above the freezing point. Food Technology Australia. 1973; 25(2):66-73. http://hdl.handle.net/102.100.100/311942?index=1



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