Framing the application of adaptation pathways for rural livelihoods and global change in eastern Indonesian islands

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Butler, James; Suadnya, Wayan; Puspadi, Ketut; Sutaryono, Yusuf; Wise, Russ; Skewes, Tim; Kirono, Dewi ORCID ID icon; Bohensky, Erin; Handayani, Tarningsih; Habibi, Putrawan; Kisman, Putranta; Suharto, Imam; Hanartani, Hanartani; Supartarningsih, Sri; Ripaldi, Adi; Fachry, Anwar; Yanuartati, Yulfia; Abbas, Gulam; Duggan, Kate; Ash, Andrew ORCID ID icon


2014-04-01


Journal Article


Global Environmental Change


28


2


2


268-382


In developing countries adaptation responses to climate and global change should be integrated with human development to generate no regrets, co-benefit strategies for the rural poor, but there are few examples of how to achieve this. The adaptation pathways approach provides a potentially useful decision-making framework because it aims to steer societies towards sustainable futures by accounting for complex systems, uncertainty and contested multi-stakeholder arenas, and by maintaining adaptation options. Using Nusa Tenggara Barat Province, Indonesia, as an example we consider whether generic justifications for adaptation pathways are tenable in the local context of climate and global change, rural poverty and development. Interviews and focus groups held with a cross-section of provincial leaders showed that the causes of community vulnerability are indeed highly complex and dynamic, influenced by 20 interacting drivers, of which climate variability and change are only two. Climate change interacts with population growth and ecosystem degradation to reduce land, water and food availability. Although poverty is resilient due to corruption, traditional institutions and fatalism, there is also considerable system flux due to decentralisation, modernisation and erosion of traditional culture. Together with several thresholds in drivers, potential shocks and paradoxes, these characteristics result in unpredictable system trajectories. Decision-making is also contested due to tensions around formal and informal leadership, corruption, community participation in planning and female empowerment. Based on this context we propose an adaptation pathways approach which can address the proximate and systemic causes of vulnerability and contested decision-making. Appropriate participatory processes and governance structures are suggested, including integrated livelihoods and multi-scale systems analysis, scenario planning, adaptive co-management and ‘livelihood innovation niches’. We briefly discuss how this framing of adaptation pathways would differ from one in the developed context of neighbouring Australia, including the influence of the province’s island geography on the heterogeneity of livelihoods and climate change, the pre-eminence and rapid change of social drivers, and the necessity to ‘leap-frog’ the Millennium Development Goals by mid-century to build adaptive capacity for imminent climate change impacts.


Elsevier


adaptive co-management; climate change; drivers of change; innovation niches; livelihoods; Millennium Development Goals


Environment Policy


EP133392


Journal article - Refereed


English


Butler, James; Suadnya, Wayan; Puspadi, Ketut; Sutaryono, Yusuf; Wise, Russ; Skewes, Tim; Kirono, Dewi; Bohensky, Erin; Handayani, Tarningsih; Habibi, Putrawan; Kisman, Putranta; Suharto, Imam; Hanartani, Hanartani; Supartarningsih, Sri; Ripaldi, Adi; Fachry, Anwar; Yanuartati, Yulfia; Abbas, Gulam; Duggan, Kate; Ash, Andrew. Framing the application of adaptation pathways for rural livelihoods and global change in eastern Indonesian islands. Global Environmental Change. 2014; 28(2 2):268-382. http://hdl.handle.net/102.100.100/95265?index=1



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