Potential Applications of Concentrated Solar Thermal Technologies in the Australian Minerals Process and Metallurgy Industry

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Eglinton, Thomas; Hinkley, Jim; Beath, Andrew; Dell 'Amico, Mark

Eglinton, Thomas; Hinkley, Jim; Beath, Andrew; Dell 'Amico, Mark


2013-11-25


Journal Article


JOM


65


12


1170-1720


The Australian minerals processing and metallurgy industries are responsible for about 20% of Australia’s total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This paper reviews the potential applications of concentrated solar thermal (CST) energy in the Australian minerals processing industry to reduce this impact. Integrating CST energy into these industries would reduce the industries’ reliance upon conventional fossil fuels and reduce GHG emissions. As CST technologies become more widely deployed and cheaper and fuel prices rise, CST energy will progressively become more competitive with conventional energy sources and some of the applications identified are expected to become economically viable. The areas of potential for CST integration identified in this study can be classed as either medium/low temperature or high temperature applications. The most promising medium/low grade applications are electricity generation and low grade heating of liquids. Electricity generation with CST energy has the greatest potential to reduce GHG emissions out of all the potential applications identified. The high temperature applications identified include the thermal decomposition of alumina or the calcination of limestone to lime in solar kilns as well as the production of syngas for various metallurgical uses including nickel and direct reduced iron production.


Springer


Mineral Processing/Beneficiation


https://doi.org/10.1007/s11837-013-0707-z


Link to Publisher's Version


© 2013 The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society


EP125714


Journal article - Refereed


English


Eglinton, Thomas; Hinkley, Jim; Beath, Andrew; Dell 'Amico, Mark. Potential Applications of Concentrated Solar Thermal Technologies in the Australian Minerals Process and Metallurgy Industry. JOM. 2013; 65(12):1170-1720. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11837-013-0707-z



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